Posts Tagged ‘bob sliga

14
Nov
10

color control panel for the ipad

Steve Hullfish and Bob Sliga blasted the FCP-L and ColorList with announcements about the new Tangent Devices vWave-Lite, a new solution to somewhat control Apple Color using your iPad.  Mr. Hullfish even posted a video of this slick new app

According to Tangent Devices website,

And while I agree with the general “Cool!” consensus out there, and while I realize it is amazing that Tangent Devices is putting this out there for FREE, I’m not sold on this approach as a viable solution for color grading because of the lack of tactile feedback from the iPad.  But Mel Matsuoka beat me to the punch, posting a nicely articulated review late last night to the FCP-L:

vWave is definitely fun and cool for what it is. I myself am hoping that they bring a “soft” version of the CP200-S and K panels to the iPad, so I can use it along my existing CP200-TS/BK panels. I cant justify another $10,000 just to get additional knobs and buttons that I wish the TS/BK panels had. Having a virtual button/knob control surface that can be mapped to every Apple Color function (and even more necessary, Davinci Resolve) would be a godsend. I wont hold my breath for this to happen, though 😉

That said, I think having a literal representation of a real world control surface on an iPad is a mistake, and not as useful as some are making it out to be. It’s cute and pretty to see the joyball and rings on the touchscreen, but the whole point of using a hardware control-surface is that you don’t have to look down at your controls while grading. And without a tactile control for your fingers to grab onto–especially in the case of the rings–you are flying half-blind on something like the vWave, because you cant tell if your finger is touching the ball widget or the ring widget onscreen. And the moment your eyes look down to find out which is which, you’ve defeated the very purpose of having a control-surface in the first place.

If I had the ability to design my own touch interface for a colorgrading control surface, it wouldn’t have balls and knobs like the vWave. it would simply be divided into 3 vertical columns, and be mapped so that any touch input that happens in the upper 2/3 of each column would affect the color-offsets, and any input that happened in the lower 1/3 would affect the lift/gamma/gain offsets.

This way, you could use your thumbs to affect the lift/gamma/gain, and your fingers to control the color offsets, and never have to look down to see if you’re touching the right control. And your hands would be positioned in a much more natural way, as well (which would could possibly be an improvement over a physical control-surface)

This is an excellent article discussing the folly of “shoehorning” real world UIs into a digital world, which I think applies here as well:

http://aaronweyenberg.com/699/is-realistic-ui-design-realistic

Interestingly enough, Aaron uses the example of an iPhone rotary-phone dialer app as an example of misguided “real world” touch-interface design.

I’ll let your own Googling inclinations veer you off topic and into the land of realistic UI design.  Back here at pro•active•ly, it comes down to the point that you are paying for knobs and tactile feedback when you invest in a control panel.  A device that comes short of providing these two key components isn’t serving you any better than mousing through Color.

proactively • it is cool though • peter

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24
May
10

hullfish and sliga on demand

Steve Hullfish posted these links to free Apple Color video tutorials the ColorList late last week.  Click the images for a link to the video.

Software Scopes Overview

Interfacing with Final Cut Pro

Advanced ColorFX Room

Advanced Grade Management

These preview videos are very, very good.  Essentially a dream teaching combo of master colorist and Color guru Bob Sliga and master workflow documentarian and writer Steve Hullfish, these preview videos are equally informative and accesible on a level that I’ve not seen produced before.  Excellent control of UI monitoring with some creative editing that I haven’t seen used in other video tutorials.  Solid and well-timed leading questions of Hullfish to Sliga to keep the instruction on track.  Explanation by Sliga down to the Finder level of what the heck is going on with Apple Color.  And an overall approach to understanding not just the what-can-Color-do questions but, IMHO more importantly, the how and why questions as well.

This series appears to be the definitive guide to learning and accessing Apple Color’s immensely powerful tools.

These videos are a good follow up to the tutorials Sliga includes in his Scone Looks which you can purchase here.  I bought them.  The Scone Looks are both an incredible value and insightful learning tool.  I use them as a guide to building my own custom grades.

And before many learning resources about Color were available, Steve Hullfish published this book.  It was my dedicated bathroom reading for a solid month, so you definitely want to get your own copy and not borrow mine.

proactively • continuing his color education • peter

Disclosure, to comply with the FTC’s new rules

None of the manufacturers listed above are paying Peter Salvia to write this article and, so far, none have sent him any samples or demonstration items.  Peter is a B&H Sales Affiliate and receives a commission from items linked to B&H and purchased through this site.  Oh yeah, and he’s an Apple Certified Trainer so you can derive his bias for yourself.

12
Dec
09

bob sliga’s scone looks for color!

Holy moly, this announcement is hot off Steve Hullfish’s ColorList presses as of Dec 11 @ 11:49am:

If anyone is interested in taking a look at my new Color Looks called the Scone Looks™ there are 4 Podcasts that preview the looks on You Tube. Just do a search for Scone Looks.

The Scone Looks™ are presets and effects users can apply to their clips for Color 1.5
483 preset looks total.
135 Primary looks which can be used in the Primary In or Out rooms.
195 Secondary Room Looks including 23 preset glows, skin softening, blue sky enhancement looks, ect.
92 CFX Looks including 2 and 3 defocus vignettes. All the CFX looks are also de-interlaced.
61 finished Grades that include a number of combination of grading techniques and effects.
12 Podcasts for beginning and advanced color correction techniques. As well as how to use and adjust the looks.
They will be available soon.

I’m just trying to make color correction easier for users of Color 1.5

Bob

This is a big wow for yours truly.  That’s a crap ton of professionally (expertly) designed Color presets.  Plus the courtesy of video tutorials explaining how to tweak them!

For those of you who don’t know him (and I’ve never met him, just heard of him from mumblings in the dark halls of DC post production houses and  the Apple Pro-Trainer listserv), Bob Sliga is “…an experienced colorist who was involved in the development of Apple Color and recently went out on his own after being part of the Apple Color team.” [Creative Cow] Additionally, the Pixel Brothers produced an interview / color grading session with Mr. Sliga and posted it back on April 9th.  Click the image for the video:

The Scone Looks include single click awesomeness to correct a bevy of typical footage issues, here’s Mr. Sliga’s updated YouTube demo…

Check out the comments for full how-to-buy info from Bob Sliga himself.

proactively • poised to step up my color grading game • peter




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